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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
in a multimedia presentation with drone surveillance and video from the consulate of the cia and annex. >> this is supposed to be sovereign u.s. territory, and if people walk in on us like that without resistance really makes your blood boil because you think to yourself what's the security? >> a video was shown to the committee last month, but this is the first time the presentation was made to the entire house. one lawmaker who asked not to be identified who said in the classified naturr of the breech r, the video who assess because the attacker is casual. fox news told james clapper, the nation's top intelligence official emphasized, the attacker's motivation unknown, and there was further questions about the obama administration's singular and immediate focus on the anti-islam video? >> why did you just focus on that part for so long rather than say, look, it's not a black and white issue. >> one of the motivations may very well be either the video, the response to the video in cairo, and, certainly, that's not ruled out. >> fox news has confirmed the decision to shut down the cia
. "outfront" tonight, national security contributor fran townsend who is on the cia and homeland security external advisory board and noah shachtman. noah, what do we think is going on right now? at what point are they in this process? >> so the assad regime has hundreds of metric tons of the building blocks of sarin. basically two big building blocks. there's isopropanol which is rubbing alcohol and phosphorous compounds. those are kept separately in order to keep things safe. but the assad regime in small, limited quantities appears to have combined those two chemicals to make deadly sarin nerve agent and has loaded them on to aerial bombs. >> if that is true, fran, it's a very provocative thing. is it provocative enough that the u.s. now has to consider action? >> well, you know, the administration has not made it clear. what the president has said is that the use of such weapons would be a red line for the united states and her allies. but it's not clear, short of use, is this preparation, is the mixing of the precursor chemicals enough? as noah can tell you this is a very unstable su
of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the committee. there are standards for assessing the credibility of sources. for how an analyst assesses a source and the information. and we know from the president's action against bin laden, he will ask the har
was -- after he won the election, and that is that the cia program, whether you find it repugnant or not, actually was effective with ksm and other people getting actionable intelligence that led to couriers that led eventually years later to the killing of osama bin laden. >> joe and mika, i saw a screening of the film on friday, and then i had breakfast on saturday with the screenwriter. it is powerful precisely because it just walks you through the story of what happened. and you can make all of the moral and political arguments that you want about what our policy on torture should be. this just tells you the story of what happened. there's no question in the record that the film shows and in other research that i've done that the name of the courier who led us to bin laden's hideout in abbottabad emerged in these harsh interrogations. and there's a weird way in watching this film in which every viewer will feel complicit in that process in a weird way. you're watching, hoping that they get the name, hoping that somehow you get enough information for the united states to act. it's a r
. even though the cia provided her talking points. so here we go again, a new boogieman, a defunked group stole the election. it's kind of funny but to nearly half believe it, it's scary, just like that boogieman that doesn't exist. thank for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> scaring the republicans. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this, with hope. i think we're getting somewhere with this fiscal cliff problem. number one, smart conservatives now say the republicans would face hell if they let this country go over the fiscal cliff. just to protect the top 2%.ç better to take the hit now, they argued, than in january with the world economy in turmoil and second recession coming. number two, john boehner, the speaker is claiming he's met obama's demand for higher taxes for the rich. that's good. he agreed in principle the rich must pay more. number three, there's talk for the republican leaders that they could vote to continue the tax cuts for the 98% now and therefore avoid the fiscal cliff
. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's the positive we're really in. >> the intelligence community which to be honest hasn't really seemed to be at least, you know, totally aaware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there's been -- there was a commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the intelligence communit
a future republican director of the cia and the pentagon working for you, a future republican secretary of state working for you. >> steve hadley. >> and a future republican national security adviser as well as madeleine albright, another democrat, but you had as many powerful republican leaders, future leaders, are as powerful democratic leaders. >> the president should be doing every week, almost every day, you have to be meeting with some of them, having dinner with them, talking to them, chatting. >> yes. >> and also threatening occasionally. >> by the way, mika has circled all the dinner guests that you've had over the years. >> some of them worked for my dad. >> it's the same principle that works in journalism, everyone knows if you're going to garn aeroreport, it's far better to get a source face-to-face. it's far bettory get a source of the fund than a person via e-mail. >> and best of all to have a relati relationship with them. >> it's just intimacy that happens between a source and a reporter. >> this president does not like that. he's not comfortable in this person, lbj, jfk
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)